How can your business make sure it’s complying with OHS?

Your organisation can improve your OHS compliance by starting with these four key steps / focus areas:

DECIDE WHO WILL HELP YOU WITH YOUR DUTIES

Appoint someone who is competent to assist you in meeting your obligations under the OH&S Act. Someone with relevant skills, knowledge and experience in managing health and safety is advisable, and you may even opt for expert advice from outside the business.

INVOLVE YOUR WORKERS

It is important to consult with your working to gauge the health and safety matters that directly affect them, as research shows effective consultation leads to better health and safety outcomes. Setting up a safety committee within the business is always a good start.

PROVIDE INFORMATION, INSTRUCTION, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION

Ensure your staff has access to your OH&S policies, which should describe how you intend to manage health and safety in your business, and outline who is responsible for certain outcomes and when/how these will be achieved. This information should be easy to understand, regularly reviewed and continuously reiterated to all staff (including contractors).

IDENTIFY HAZARDS, AND PLAN FOR EMERGENCIES

It is not possible to eliminate all hazards in your workplace, therefore it’s important to identify which hazards require the most urgent attention and identify sensible ways to control the risk. Making relevant plans and arrangements in the event of an emergency is crucial, and establishing a Register of Incidents and Injuries, as well as taking out Workers Compensation Insurance, may assist in minimising costs in the unlikely case of an OH&S incident.

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Mark Ritchie

Mark Ritchie

Mark is passionate about helping Australian businesses efficiently resolve their industrial relations issues. Mark has demonstrated proficiency advising managers, executives and boards of small to medium-sized enterprises, as well as some of Australia’s best-known companies, on both litigious and non-litigious matters.

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